Justin Timberlake to Join the Folk Scene in Coen Bros’ ‘Inside Llewyn Davis’?

Justin TimberlakeWe have all been pleading with our various deities to return Justin Timberlake to his rightful place in the music world. Now, he’s not entirely there yet, but he has been making small steps. He will be playing a musical icon in the Neil Bogart biopic Spinning Gold. A week and a half ago, Timberlake was featured in FreeSol’s “Role Model” video. The latest has it that he might be getting into a new musical scene: folk.

Now, Timberlake fans might not necessarily be a big folk-loving audience, but a more encouraging aspect of this story might come attached to the names behind it all—the Coen Brothers. Joel and Ethan Coen are directing a film called Inside Llewyn Davis, chronicling the career of a folk musician in 1960s Greenwich Village. Starring in the film are Oscar Isaac as the title character and Carey Mulligan in a supporting role. Both actors were featured in the Ryan Gosling action twister Drive.

The character offered to Timberlake (he has not yet accepted) is a folk musician named Jim, and will be the husband of Mulligan’s character.

Timberlake’s early film choices were pretty flimsy, including crime dramas like Longshot and comedies like The Love Guru (although, Alpha Dog…really not so bad). The Social Network bumped up his average substantially, and this summer’s Friends with Benefits and last week’s In Time are unexpectedly fun. So, the next logical step is a Coen Brothers movie. If you are indeed trying to make acting your primary career, JT, this is the way to go. Plus…we all really want to see you sing again, folk music or otherwise.

Source: Variety

Staff editor Michael Arbeiter’s natural state of being can best be described as “mild panic attack.” His earliest memories of growing up in Queens, New York, involve nighttime conversations with a voice from his bedroom wall (the jury’s still out on what that was all about) and a love for classic television that spawned from the very first time he was allowed to watch “The Munsters.” Attending college at SUNY Binghamton, a 20-year-old Michael learned two things: that he could center his future on this love for TV and movies, and that dragons never actually existed — he was kind of late in the game on that one.

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