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Mos Def stars in harrowing Guantanamo Bay video

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Jul 08, 2013 | 12:32pm EDT

Rapper Mos Def was left in tears, begging for mercy in a hard-hitting new video as he was given a taste of what hunger-striking detainees at Guantanamo Bay have to allegedly endure as medics force feed them daily to keep them alive. The short film, shot by Asif Kapadia in collaboration with human rights organisation Reprieve and hosted by Britain's The Guardian newspaper, features Def, aka Yasiin Bey, strapped and chained to a chair and protesting as three nurses attempt to force a tube through his nostril. The hip-hop star and poet squirms and screams, "Please, please, please... Stop, please stop. I can't do it anymore." He then breaks down in tears when the medics halt the demonstration as the message "In Guantanamo Bay, the full procedure is carried out twice a day. Typically, it takes two hours to complete" appears on screen. The video, which was shot on 15 June (13) in London, begins with statistics suggesting 44 of the 120 hunger strikers at the detention camp are currently being force fed and Def insists that what he goes through in the film is "standard operating procedure for force feeding detainees". A traumatised Mos Def says, "I really didn't know what to expect. The first part of it is not that bad, but then you get this burning, I had this burning (sensation) and it just starts to be unbearable. It feels like something's going into my brain and it started to reach the back of my throat and I really, really... couldn't take it." The Guantanamo Bay detention camp in Cuba was established in January, 2002, to detain people the U.S. Government determined as terrorists who threatened homeland security. A group of Guantanamo Bay detainees began a hunger strike earlier this year (13) to protest their detention. The U.S. has rejected pleas to stop the force-feeding for the month of Ramadan, which begins on Monday night (08Jul13). The process has been deemed a form of torture by the United Nations Commission on Human Rights.

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