Recap

'Brooklyn Nine-Nine' Recap: Who Were the MVPs of 'Full Boyle'?

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Feb 12, 2014 | 11:45am EST

Brooklyn Nine-NineFOX Broadcasting Co.

After meeting on last week's episode of Brooklyn Nine-Nine, Boyle's relationship with Vivian is now progressing at top speed, and his new-found love is giving him some new-found confidence. Peralta is worried that he's moving too fast and will scare Vivian away, so he tags along on a double date in order to stop him from ruining it. However, after a series of weird conversation topics, a hasty retreat from the dinner table and an accidental pepper spray war, both Peralta and Boyle discover that Vivian is just as crazy in love as Boyle is, and the two reunite in a sweet, yet surprisingly graphic, cap to the episode.

Meanwhile, Holt is facing opposition for the first time ever in his campaign for President of the African American Gay and Lesbian New York City Policeman’s Association (or AAGLNYCPA for short), an organization he founded and has nurtured for 25 years. Santiago and Diaz refuse to take a civilian who calls himself "Super Dan" seriously, despite the fact that he has evidence that could help them with their drug bust. Between a homemade superhero, Boyle's new low-slung jeans, and Scully and Hitchcock's in-depth ear cleaning, there was plenty to laugh at in "Full Boyle." But who managed to steal the show, and become president of this week's Brooklyn Nine-Nine?

Boyle and Peralta 
Now that Boyle's found love, he's full of confidence (he's even wearing tight jeans!) but that doesn't stop him from having a full-on meltdown when he feels like his enthusiasm might drive Vivian away. We've gotten a few glimpses at suave, confident Boyle before, and it was great to see the show revisit that, but Joe Lo Truglio plays manic and over-eager just as well as he does cool and collected, and so getting to see both of them in the same episode was a treat. He and Andy Samberg are turning out to be one of the show's most reliably funny duos, as the two of them continue to play off of each other brilliantly. 
- Before Boyle got his groove back, he was answering to Charlize Broil in the coffee shop for five years. 
- After Boyle sings Jimmy Buffet at a crime scene, Peralta snaps him out of it: "Dead guy, Charles." 
- Boyle, on the tourist he interviewed: "Guy was from Canada, said it was probably his fault for getting robbed, and then apologized for wasting my time." Peralta: "Oh, Canada. Truly the Odie to America's Garfield." 
- Peralta on what Boyle plans to have a skywriter write in the clouds: "'Charles loves V' means something very specific, and I'm guessing not what you're intending." 
- After Santiago tells Peralta he's too immature to help Boyle with his relationship: "I prefer to think of myself as a beautiful angel of love, but who is unable to find love for himself. Admit that you would see that movie!" 
- Between his finger-guns signal for Peralta to help him and his nervous giggle when Vivian arrives, Boyle was full of wonderful weirdness. 
- Peralta, meeting his date Bernice: "Hello, I'm Jack... Tractive." Berenice: "Jack Tractive?" Peralta: "My parents were hippies."
- Peralta, changing the subject on their double date: "Here's a question for the group: What's the longest funeral you've ever been to?" 
- Boyle, to Vivian: "I love it when you talk broth." 
- After Boyle buys last minute tickets for him and Vivian to Rome: "We leave in two hours. It's a terrible itenerary, we connect through Vietnam." 

Holt 
Like with Charles, this week gave us two great sides of Holt: he's flustered by the fact that someone is running against him, but he's still as serious and deadpan as always. "Full Boyle" was an episode that relied heavily on one-liners, and Andre Braugher delivered every single one of them perfectly. He's even brought back his habit of drawing out the ends of his sentences to make his delivery extra stilted, to great effect. 
- On the AAGLYNYCPA: "It's not really my organization. I mean, I did found it, and I have been president for the last 25 years, and I oversee every single detail, but really, it's our organization." 
- Gina, after meeting Brian Jensen: "He was a nice man." Holt: "He was. Now, let's figure out a way to... destroy him."
- Holt's opening joke for his campaign speech: "What's the hardest part about being a black gay police officer? The discrimination... I believe that's what you call 'observational humor.'"
- "The meeting is beginning. The stakes are very high for me. I'm getting nervous. My stomach is... in flux."
- On Brian: "He has no gravitas. Do you know what gravitas sounds like? 'Greetings. Alllll.'"
- Holt voted for himself when he was the only member of the group. There's nothing Holt enjoys more than obeying the rules. 
- Congratulating Brian on his new position as president: "If you screw this up, I will impeach you. I wrote the by-laws, so I know how to do it. But I'm very happy for you. But I will impeach you if necessary." 

Gina 
Gina and Holt is a pairing that should make absolutely no sense. After all, she's completely insane and he's incredibly straight-laced. But they play off of each other brilliantly. Gina wasn't as off-the-wall as she has been in past episodes, which helped make it seem a bit less strange when she was the one delivering the serious speech that helped change Holt's mind, but thankfully wherever Gina goes, weirdness isn't too far behind. 
- "You should make me your campaign manager. I was born for politics: I have great hair and I love lying." 
- Gina's research on Brian Jensen is actually research on a World War I army commander from Norway. 
- After Holt dismisses her idea to deck him out in a silver suit, sunglasses and roller skates with a curt, "What else have you got?": "Nothing. I thought for sure that would be a slam dunk." 
- Floorgasm finally made an appearance, in all of their weird, awkward, terribly dressed glory. 
- On their Floorgasm routine: "Did you like it? It was inspired by the city of New York... in that I stole it form some kids I saw dancing in a subway station." 

 

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