Ashton Kutcher Might Play Himself on ‘Two and a Half Men’

Ashton KutcherThe theories on Ashton Kutcher’s new character, being brought onto Two and a Half Men to replace Charlie Sheen’s Charlie Harper, have been plentiful. He’s Alan’s new tenant. He’s Alan’s new landlord. He’s Charlie’s illegitimate son. He’s Charlie Harper himself after reconstructive surgery (this is my personal favorite). But the latest possibility is that Kutcher will actually play Kutcher.

The actor is, admittedly, a character on his own. For better or worse, Punk’d really brought him out of the That ’70s Show outline and into his own celebrity persona. So, it’s not so hard to believe that Chuck Lorre and Co. would consider sticking Kutcher’s actual persona into the reality of Two and a Half Men to pal around with (or perhaps be at odds with) Alan and Jake Harper (Jon Cryer and Angus T. Jones).

The truth is, nobody knows yet. The secrecy extends to withholding the premiere scripts until just two days before the episode’s table read. Whether Kutcher will play Kutcher, Charlie, Raymond, Kelso or some other character, celebrity cameos will not be spared in the Season 9 opener. Reportedly, various big names will show up in the premiere to play themselves, possibly as interested buyers of the Harper household (which Alan can no longer afford on his own due to Charlie’s absence).

Sheen’s character is still said to be removed “violently,” without any hope of ever returning. Meanwhile, Sheen’s Comedy Central Roast is still set to broadcast the same night as the Two and a Half Men premiere. So clearly, everyone has pretty much buried the hatchet on this whole mess.

Source: Deadline

Staff editor Michael Arbeiter’s natural state of being can best be described as “mild panic attack.” His earliest memories of growing up in Queens, New York, involve nighttime conversations with a voice from his bedroom wall (the jury’s still out on what that was all about) and a love for classic television that spawned from the very first time he was allowed to watch “The Munsters.” Attending college at SUNY Binghamton, a 20-year-old Michael learned two things: that he could center his future on this love for TV and movies, and that dragons never actually existed — he was kind of late in the game on that one.

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