Lorne Michaels Says ’30 Rock’ Will Continue After Alec Baldwin Leaves

Corey MatthewsToday is just filled with news about the possibility of hyperextending television series. I just finished reporting on one of my favorite shows that is in danger of going on past its due, and now I’m forced to bring up another: 30 Rock.

Lorne Michaels recently said that, although he “can’t imagine the show going on without Alec Baldwin” he doesn’t intend to end it anytime soon. Baldwin stated that he intends to leave the show after the upcoming sixth season, which many fans (and Baldwin himself) assumed would bring an end to the series entirely. Michaels feels no such way, however, and intends to continue 30 Rock for seasons to come.

30 Rock was, for its first three seasons, remarkably funny, interesting and well-written. Although I’d never jump off the bandwagon entirely, I will say that Seasons 4 and 5 did not live up to the quality in which the show once reveled. However, they were still acceptable, due in large to Jack Donaghy’s (Baldwin) mammoth prominence, as well as his relationship with Tina Fey’s Liz Lemon (which is the show’s lifeblood). To continue the show without Jack would be to turn the show into something it is not. Since the first episode, the show was about Liz and Jack: we watched an antagonistic rivalry grow organically into a heartfelt, codependent friendship. So, without one component of this primary drive of the series, we’ve just got a lot of this. And don’t get me wrong: that’s hilarious. But is it enough to stay invested? Yeah, more or less. I know I’ll keep watching. But that’s not the point! Oh, what’s the use. Do what you will, NBC. I’m forever a slave to your flash cuts and rapid-fire celebrity jabs.

Source: Vulture

Staff editor Michael Arbeiter’s natural state of being can best be described as “mild panic attack.” His earliest memories of growing up in Queens, New York, involve nighttime conversations with a voice from his bedroom wall (the jury’s still out on what that was all about) and a love for classic television that spawned from the very first time he was allowed to watch “The Munsters.” Attending college at SUNY Binghamton, a 20-year-old Michael learned two things: that he could center his future on this love for TV and movies, and that dragons never actually existed — he was kind of late in the game on that one.

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