9 Strangest Hosts of the MTV Movie Awards

Jessica Alba, 2006
Jessica Alba, 2006
MTV has never conformed to tradition. So while other award shows recruited the most respected comedians and comediennes to emcee the event, it's no surprise the rebellious network opted for talent not traditionally known for their ability to carry a highly rated telecast. And though the MTV Movie Awards has gotten back on the funny track with this year's Rebel Wilson, MTV has made some strange choices, including 2006's not-so-Fantastic host, Alba. {Image Credit: Chris Polk/FilmMagic}
Chris Polk/FilmMagic
Lindsay Lohan, 2004
Lindsay Lohan, 2004
Before drugs, theft allegations, and I Know Who Killed Mekilled the actress' career, Lohan became the youngest host in MTV Movie Award history. She also picked up an award for Breakthrough Performance for Freaky Friday, and then suffered a downward spiral more fitting of Vh1's Behind the Music than MTV. {Image Credit: Kevin Winter/Getty Images}
Kevin Winter/Getty Images
Seann William Scott and Justin Timberlake, 2003
Seann William Scott and Justin Timberlake, 2003
The last two hosts subject to the MTV Movie Awards' bizarre penchant for bizarre hosting duos, an American Wedding-era Scott teamed up with Timberlake, whose biggest film credit to date was the charmingly embarrassing Model Behavior. But his comedic skills during the award show certainly justified (get it?) Timberlake's future successes on Saturday Night Live. {Image Credit: MTV}
Chris Pizzello/AP Photo
Sarah Michelle Gellar and Jack Black, 2002
Sarah Michelle Gellar and Jack Black, 2002
Fresh off of Orange County, Black inexplicably teamed up with teen dream Gellar, whose Scooby Doo appealed to kids as much as High Fidelity appealed to stoned music lovers. But the union led to Jack Black: Spider-Man, a well-recieved short that featured Black as the aforementioned web-slinging hero, and Gellar as a Wonder Woman who gave Whedonites way too many ideas. {Image Credit: Mark J. Terrill/AP Photo}
Mark J. Terrill/AP Photo
Kirsten Dunst and Jimmy Fallon, 2001
Kirsten Dunst and Jimmy Fallon, 2001
The Bring It On star had a history with the awards — Dunst earned her first Golden Popcorn at 13 for Interview With a Vampire. And the SNL star would go on to have a history with the awards — Fallon returned to host the MTV Movie Awards in 2005. That, however, would prove to be their only link, besides their sometimes questionable movie choices. (Hello Crazy/Beautiful and Taxi!) {Image Credit: Dave Hogan/Getty Images}
Dave Hogan/Getty Images
Sarah Jessica Parker, 2000
Sarah Jessica Parker, 2000
Watching the 2000 MTV Movie Awards, I couldn't help but wonder: Why did the ceremony catered to teens choose a mature host like Sex and the City's Parker, who had little to offer besides wearing 14 different dresses during the show? {Image Credit: Frank Micelotta/Getty Images}
Frank Micelotta/Getty Images
Lisa Kudrow, 1999
Lisa Kudrow, 1999
The Friends star — known more for her rendition of "Smelly Cat" than hosting an awards show — might seem a curious choice for MTV, but her hilarious Star Wars parody during the event continued to prove that Kudrow's our lobster. {Image Credit: Frank Micelotta/Getty Images}
Frank Micelotta/Getty Images
Samuel L. Jackson, 1998
Samuel L. Jackson, 1998
Jackson's penchant for profanity might have appealed to MTV's teen market, but his bloody film resumé — which boasted roles in Pulp Fiction and Jackie Brown — certainly didn't cater to the young set. Still, the MTV Movie Awards kicked off the actor's venerable emcee career, which included multiple stints hosting the ESPYs and Spike TV's Video Game Awards. {Image Credit: Frank Micelotta/Getty Images}
Frank Micelotta/Getty Images
Jon Lovitz and Courteney Cox, 1995
Jon Lovitz and Courteney Cox, 1995
Lovitz — at the the time, star of The Critic — co-starred on the critically acclaimed Friends in 1995. Yet there would be nothing else that would tie this hosting duo together until six years later, when they both starred in 3000 Miles to Graceland. But even stranger than the pairing? The fact that Lovitz and Cox opened up the show with a song. {Image Credit: MTV}
MTV
Kate Ward is the current Executive Editor for Hollywood.com, a former editor and writer for Entertainment Weekly and EW.com, and a forever fan of pop culture. A graduate of the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, Ward — whose work has also appeared in Glamour magazine — loves talking about nutgrafs and hates exclamation points, despite using them on a regular basis. Specializing in reality TV, ’90s nostalgia, and bad movies, Ward is likely the oldest person to attend "American Idols LIVE!" every year with her mom.

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