Author

Aly Semigran
Staff editor Aly Semigran is a New York City native who grew up in Philadelphia and spent the better part of her youth trying to figure out what the Philly Phanatic was (an anteater?), quoting 'The Simpsons,' and learning all about movies from her dad. After graduating from Temple University, where she studied journalism, she moved back to NYC and began her career as a freelance entertainment journalist. Her work has been published in Entertainment Weekly, Maxim, Philadelphia Weekly, Philadelphia City Paper, MTV.com, and iVillage.com. She is thrilled to be a part of the Hollywood.com team and she is still quoting 'The Simpsons.' ('I'm Idaho!')
  • 'Saturday Night Live' Season Finale Will Mark Bill Hader's Last Appearance: Our 5 Favorite Moments
    By: Aly Semigran May 18, 2013
    Musical guest Kanye West might not be willing to make a fool of himself for the sake of comedy or self-awareness on the season finale of Saturday Night Live tonight (he is not a celebrity after all, just an exceedingly wealthy person who does everything in his power to stay out of the spotlight), but thankfully host Ben Affleck, who will join the five-timers club, certainly has had no problem doing that on the show.  Of course, no one has been more willing to go the extra mile for a laugh quite like departing cast member Bill Hader. The hilarious jack-of-all-trades was always the best part of every sketch and, let's face it, he's created one of the all-time great SNL characters with Stefon. While his well-meaning but misinformed Weekend Update city correspondent is no doubt Hader's crown jewel during his seven seasons on the show, the multi-talented performer had a long roster of amazing moments.  Tonight's episode will unfortunately mark Hader's last (it could also be the last time we see Fred Armisen and Jason Sudeikis as cast members, too), so that means no more Stefon, no more fake game show hosts, and no more spot-on impressions of Al Pacino. In anticipation of the Season 38 finale and Hader's farewell, we narrowed down the star's five best moments on SNL. It was not easy.  You know it's that thing where you'll be quoting Stefon for years and this was the one that started it all. (Editor's Note: in a total full circle moment, Stefon actually popped up in a Ben Affleck-hosted episode back in 2008, but this was his first time he was front and center).  The only person you wanted to see more on Weekend Update was Hader's bats**t crazy take on James 'The Ragin' Cajun' Carville.  Seriously, have you ever seen a better Alan Alda impression in your life?? You can even hear the amazed audience react to it.  Ohhhhh noooooooooo, you like his Keith Morrison impression, too?  Hader made the quintessential grumpy old man. No, not Clint Eastwood (though that was pretty spectacular, too) but depth perception-impared and all-around terrible news reporter Herb Welch.  We won't miss Season 38 very much, but you better believe we'll miss Hader a hell of a lot. Saturday Night Live, with host Ben Affleck and musical guest Kanye West, airs tonight at 11:30 PM/ET on NBC.  Follow Aly on Twitter @AlySemigran and Hollywood.com @Hollywood_com More: 'Saturday Night Live' Promo: Ben Affleck Makes Bill Hader Lose His S**tBill Hader is Leaving 'Saturday Night Live' Kanye West Rants Angrily About 'SNL'   From Our Partners:Zoe Saldana Strips Down For Magazine (Celebuzz)33 Child Stars: Where Are They Now? (Celebuzz)
  • Greta Gerwig and Mickey Sumner Discuss Their Film 'Frances Ha,' a Love Letter to Friendship, And Their Own Real-Life Bond
    By: Aly Semigran May 18, 2013
    If Harmony Korine's candy coated debauchery fest Spring Breakers was every parent's worst nightmare realized, then Noah Baumbach's sublime Frances Ha, a love letter to New York City and truly finding yourself in it is just the opposite of that, in every way possible.  Greta Gerwig — who plays the titular Frances, a 20-something dancer working through the ups and downs of careers, apartments, and friendships in the Big Apple — explains, "I feel like the people who have most pulled me aside [after seeing the film] have honestly been parents in their 50s and 60s who are like, 'My daughter is in New York and I understand this.' And they feel it as parents in this way that's very intense, and they feel grateful because the movie took care of these characters. They feel like the world will take care of their children."  It probably doesn't hurt that Gerwig — who co-wrote the funny, heartfelt, and blisteringly honest (parents might have an easier time getting through Frances Ha than the 20-somethings it reflects will, as it hits all too close to home sometimes) along with Baumbach — claims to be something of an old soul herself. "I've never felt young in my whole life, so that helped," Gerwig says of making Frances Ha, a film that can often feel like if Girls met Woody Allen.  And while the the actress is as vibrant and fashionable and beautiful as anyone in their 20s (she is 29-years-old), she does have the grace and wisdom of someone well beyond her years, or her generation, for that matter. She can discuss classic literature and modern sexism, often in the same breath.  "I just re-read Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own, and I think that people get really angry when it's women doing it, to be totally honest," Gerwigs says when on the subject of why female-lead entertainment like Frances Ha or Girls get unfairly criticized, while their male counterparts can go largely unscathed. "There's something that feels threatening about it and they have to be doing something other than being thoughtful," she continues. "It has to be somehow an exercise in narcissism, because why else would you make anything about women? I think that the violence of the reaction has more to do with something that's not to do with the art." Social injustices aside, Gerwig takes no credit away from her on and off-screen collaborator Baumbach (whom she is dating) in the telling of Frances' story. "He's a man in his 40s and I'm a woman in her 20s, but I feel like, in a way, I wouldn't have written this unless I was writing it with him," she says. "It felt like he almost gave me permission to tell my story. Or, not my story, but the story of this woman. Because it validated it, because it was outside eyes. I think if I were left alone I wouldn't have the courage to say, 'I'm going to tell the story of a 27-year-old dancer and her best friend and their money troubles.' That wouldn't feel like enough of a story for me, and it was the fact that he said, 'Oh, I think this can be really good, and I have a lot of empathy for this.' That allowed me to feel more magnanimous towards my generation than I might be otherwise, because I can be just as critical as anyone else."  It's true that Frances Ha doesn't shy away from truthfully telling a 20-something woman's story, particularly one set in New York City. While the core of Frances' story may be a universal one, it is one that is quintessentially New York. Missed late night F trains, outrageous ATM fees, and even more outrageous rent rates are just as critical to telling Frances' story as the relationships in it. As any New Yorker will tell you, the highs and lows alike are an almost daily occurrence, often taking place within seconds of each other.  Take it from Gerwig, a New Yorker herself, who recalls one of those very New York moments you assume one only sees on screen. "One day I was walking down the street and I was so happy and wearing a cute outfit and a cab went by and did the thing where the water splashes on you and I was like, 'Am I in Sex and the City? Am I Carrie Bradshaw? What is happening?' It was so absurd," Gerwig says, adding, "You can't get the romance of the city without having the hardship of the city, and it's totally built into the romance, too. That's part of the idealization of it, I think." Again, don't be fooled into thinking that Frances Ha only reaches out to the demographic of young, urban women. As Gerwig's co-star Mickey Sumner, who plays Frances' best friend Sophie, notes, it's a film that strikes just as strong a chord with men of any age. "I think the reactions that I've had the pleasure of experiencing from people coming out of seeing the movie is that this is not a chick flick," she says. "Grown men, boys my age, coming out [of the theater] crying. This English guy, maybe 65-years-old, came up to me and said, 'That is the first movie in a really long time that I understood. People relate to it, because it's not about girls who are 27. It's about friendship."  Sumner is right. More than any other aspect of Frances Ha — doomed relationships, neurotic New York City life, financial woes, professional setbacks — it is a movie, at its very core, about friendship. Particularly the phase of close friendships in which one person goes one way, and the other person goes sharply towards another. In the case of former roommates and best friends Frances and Sophie, one struggles to keep her head above water while pursuing her passion, while the other embarks on a whirlwind romance with a guy named Patch.  "[Noah and I] discovered that it was a love story between Frances and Sophie, and it activated everything," Gerwig recalls. "As soon as we realized it was that, that was the story. There was not a romantic story. It wasn't a sad story. It wasn't an extra story. It was the story. It felt very right for me because I've been through it with friends." If the friendship on screen between Frances and Sophie feels so authentic (the ups, the downs, the little moments and tics only you and your best friend can share or understand) it's because Gerwig and Sumner have such a solid, loving friendship off screen. Take this this witty, heartfelt exchange between the two actresses, which feels like it could have been a page directly out of Frances Ha's script:  Greta: "My friendship with Mickey is all just light and happiness."Mickey: "I hope we never break up."Greta: "We met as adults, though, which is different. I feel like it changes it. I'll never be like, 'Mickey, why do you have dinner with anyone else besides me?'"Mickey: "Although, secretly, I'm waiting for that moment. I'd actually be like, 'Yes! ... We're real friends.'" Frances Ha is currently playing in limited release.  Follow Aly on Twitter @AlySemigran and Hollywood.com @Hollywood_com More:  'Frances Ha' Review  'Frances Ha' Trailer: Think 'Girls' in Black-and-WhiteGreta Gerwig: "It's a Special Time to Be a Girl Making Movies"  From Our Partners:What Happened to 33 Child Stars (Celebuzz)40 Most Revealing See-Through Red Carpet Looks (Vh1)  
  • 'Don't Trust the B' On Your Computer Screen: All 8 Unaired Eps Now Online
    By: Aly Semigran May 17, 2013
    Maybe the titular 'B' in Apartment 23 couldn't be trusted, but that doesn't mean she wasn't cut down before her prime, when the show had only hit its stilettoed stride. The biting ABC comedy,  starring Krysten Ritter, Dreama Walker, and James Van Der Beek, only got one-and-a-half measly seasons, but thankfully, as it was announced last month, we'll get our final fill of Don't Trust the B.  The eight remaining episodes of Season 2 that weren't aired are now available to watch on Hulu. That's right, the b**ch is back, and totally free! In fact, you should just kick back, relax, and enjoy them all right now. If your boss has a problem with that, well just give them your best Chloe-isms. They'll probably back off.  Here's one of the eight episodes, titled "Monday June":  More: 'Apt. 23' Fans Get Their B Back for 8 Episodes'Don't Trust the B' Finale Recap: Good Shitagi10 Bitchiest One-Lines from 'Don't Trust the B' From Our Partners:Zoe Saldana Strips Down For Magazine (Celebuzz)33 Child Stars: Where Are They Now? (Celebuzz)
  • 'The Office' Series Finale: A Lovely, Sincere Send-Off For Dunder Mifflin...and Michael Scott Was There!
    By: Aly Semigran May 17, 2013
    Well, that was tremendously satisfying. That's what she said. After nine seasons on NBC, the American adaptation of Ricky Gervais' beloved British series of the same name, The Office was given an absolutely lovely, sincere, and near-perfect send-off. No, not everything in the episode worked. But what did work — those heartfelt reunions and goodbyes — are what really stood out and what mattered and what made this 75-minute finale so very special.  But, that's almost fitting in a way. The past few years of The Office were pretty bad, but the finale erased all of that. This is exactly what the conclusion was about: redeeming yourself, making peace with something, remembering the good over the bad, and finding the beauty in imperfections. Everyone had their happy ending, including The Office itself.  Picking up a year after the airing of the PBS documentary about them, and a day before Dwight and Angela's wedding, we found our favorite characters at different places in their lives. But the employees of Dunder Mifflin were — and still are — at their core, a family. But, you can't have a family unit without it's papa bear, which in their case is Michael Scott. Yes, the rumors were confirmed and our wishes came true: Steve Carell returned for the finale, and it was just perfect.  After Jim was named best man for Dwight's wedding — or, as the Schrute's call it, Bestest Mensch — and he went above and beyond the call of duty (aw, remember the episode when Jim was terrible at Call of Duty?) by pulling off the Best... Prank... Ever... and surprising the groom with a new Bestest Mensch: one Michael Gary Scott. And their first exchange in nearly two years went as follows:  Dwight: "I can't believe you came." Michael: "That's what she said." Oh, Michael, you haven't changed a bit. Well, he did a little, in that he now has gray hair and is blissfully happy with a wife and their kids. But at the core, he's still the same old Michael. He still can't dance and he still says things that come out wrong ("I feel like all my kids grew up and married each other... it's every parent's dream!"), but his heart is still in the right place. Please, please let the Emmys at least give Carell one for a guest appearance.   Michael wasn't the only one who got a happy ending so richly deserved. Pam finally made a big, romantic gesture to Jim and decided to move their family to Austin so he could pursue his dream; Dwight and Angela got married; Kelly and Ryan (that's right, Mindy Kaling and B.J. Novak returned, too) got back together (even if they did so in the most terrible way possible: by ditching a baby... though would you expect any different from those two?); Andy went from a laughing stock to a hometown hero; Darryl enjoyed his continued success; Toby enthusiastically got invited to hang out; Oscar enjoyed a senatorial campaign (but sadly no showcase of his origami skills) and, in the most touching happy ending of them all, Erin finally got to meet her birth parents (played by Joan Cusack and Ed Begley Jr.).  But, really, even if they didn't have a big goodbye, all the characters walked away with something: wisdom. Lucky for us, they all got to share a few pearls (major kudos to The Office writing team for this episode, it was some absolutely beautiful stuff): - "I wish there was a way to know you're in the good old days before you've actually left them." Oh, Nard Dog. Someone should write a song about that.   - "I worked for a paper company all these years, but I never wrote anything down." Phyllis just destroyed me in this episode (she was so concerned about Andy, and she carried her old nemesis Angela down the aisle, and was so genuinely happy to receive her gift of a cute bird statue of herself from her grumpy pal Stanley) and this little snippet was a reminder to us all to take more pictures and write down your memories — you'll really cherish them someday. - "Yes, I'd say I have gotten along with my subordinates." Dwight, referring to his wife Angela, best man Jim, and his best friend (aw!) Pam, among others.  - "Everything I have I owe to this job. This stupid, wonderful, boring, amazing job." Jim, TV's best crush, always and forever.  - "There's a lot of beauty in ordinary things. Isn't that kind of the point?" Pam, who grew into her own and allowed herself to find happiness over the course of nine years. As she simply put it, "Be strong, trust yourself, love yourself, conquer your fears, go after what you want." And thank goodness that The Office saw the beauty in ordinary things and ordinary people who were capable of extraordinary things.  Other finale highlights:  - Bringing back characters like Carol the realtor (Carell's wife in real life, Nancy Walls), Elizabeth the stripper, and of course, Mose. - Cameos by Seth Meyers and Bill Hader as themselves. Hey, we'll take as much of those guys on SNL as we can while we can get 'em. - Dwight carrying/dancing with Angela. - The group shot in front of Pam's mural calling for "everyone from the office." Judging by the cameo by Greg Daniels, it was likely everyone from The Office.  - Creed's beautiful guitar serenade in the office. - Reminscing about the Office Olympics. - Pam getting in one last "Dunder Mifflin, this is Pam" and taking her painting of the office building with her. - Just. All of it, really. Goodbye old friends. And thank you.  Follow Aly on Twitter @AlySemigran and Hollywood.com @Hollywood_com More:  'The Office': The 10 Best (and 5 Worst) Episodes The 5 Biggest Character Transformations on 'The Office' Steve Carell is Returning for the Series Finale of 'The Office' From Our Partners:Watch Justin Bieber Attacked in Dubai (Celebuzz)33 Child Stars: Where Are They Now? (Celebuzz)
  • 'Graceland', 'Horizon', 'Sirens', 'Playing House', and 'Modern Family' Join the USA Family
    By: Aly Semigran May 16, 2013
    USA closed out the week of upfront presentations in New York City and the top-rated cable network rolled out trailers for all of their upcoming series, as well as welcome Modern Family to their brood.  While the network showed a trailer for Graceland, their new gritty crime drama loosely based on the true life story about a group of FBI agents who live together at a picturesque beachfront home, the network debuted a full trailer on Thursday. Lead by Les Mis star Aaron Tveit, Graceland — which debuted at SXSW and is currently available on demand — takes the fail-safe USA formula (glossy, attractive cast, snappy banter), but gives it a grittier, darker twist. Also looking to shake things up at USA is the World War II thriller Horizon. Shrouded in mystery, the teaser trailer gives the impression that aliens could be on the horizon for the FBI workers in Horizon. Plus, there's the oh-so-cute Bryan Greenberg in the adaptation of Elmore Leonard's The Arrangement.  In addition to Graceland (which premiers on June 24) and Horizon, USA announced two new scripted comedies: the grown-gal-pals-living-together show Playing House (featuring Bridesmaids star Jessica St. Clair) and the Denis Leary-produced wise guy emergency responder series Sirens. The network is also getting into the unscripted game with the Big Brother-goes-to-summer-camp series called, you guessed it, Summer Camp and the lawyer reality show Partners in Crime.  But, the network's biggest get for the 2013 season, by far, is nabbing awards show favorite Modern Family in syndication. (The cast filmed a cable-friendly, hilariously raunchy segment for the upfronts. You've never really seen the Dunphys until you've heard them drop the F-bomb). Welcome to USA, Gloria.  Follow Aly on Twitter @AlySemigran and Hollywood.com @Hollywood_com More: 'Graceland' Star Aaron Tveit On Going From Stage to Screen'Burn Notice' To End After Seven Seasons on USA'Supernatural' Changes Time Slots This Fall on The CW From Our Partners:Watch Justin Bieber Attacked in Dubai (Celebuzz)33 Child Stars: Where Are They Now? (Celebuzz)
  • Fred Armisen and Jason Sudeikis Reportedly Leaving 'SNL' Alongside Bill Hader
    By: Aly Semigran May 16, 2013
    The world found out earlier this week that this week's  Saturday Night Live hosted by Ben Affleck will not only mark the end of the 38th season, but that of Bill Hader's tenure on the show. To add insult to Stefan's injury, it will also reportedly be the final episode for Fred Armisen's and Jason Sudeikis as well.  According to the always-reliable New York Post, Armisen, who has been on SNL for 11 seasons now is set to exit, and Sudeikis, the boy who cried departure has been on for eight seasons, will "probably" go, too.  Both Armisen and Sudeikis (pictured above as President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden) have undeniably moved from the forefront to the background over the past couple of years (Armisen has seemed to put all of his energy into his IFC cult hit Portlandia, while Sudeikis has focused on his movie career), but those very same background skills will be sorely missed in the "What Up With That?" sketch.  Follow Aly on Twitter @AlySemigran More: Bill Hader is Leaving 'Saturday Night Live' Seth Meyers to Replace Jimmy Fallon on 'Late Night' 'Saturday Night Live' Recap: Kristen Wiig Deserved Better  From Our Partners:Zoe Saldana Strips Down For Magazine (Celebuzz)33 Child Stars: Where Are They Now? (Celebuzz)
  • The 5 Biggest Character Transformations on 'The Office'
    By: Aly Semigran May 16, 2013
    A lot can happen to a person over the course of nine years. You can change jobs, you can fall in love, you can face the loss of your favorite television show... and all of that will make you turn into the person you are today.  We've seen the characters at Dunder Mifflin grow (and sometimes regress) since the debut of The Office back in 2005, and with the series coming to an end on Thursday, May 16, we wanted to look back and see who has changed the most. While some have stayed rigidly the same, we've witnessed others evolve right before our eyes, for better or for worse. (And no, Ryan doesn't count, because he has been, and always will be, a total d-bag). While we weren't always sure or didn't always agree with the direction in which the writers would take these characters, after nine seasons, we still felt like we knew them, inside and out.  Here are the five biggest character transformations.  Michael Scott Watching Michael Scott now in the pilot is nothing short of painful. Yes, Michael was always an awkward, terribly uncool boss, constantly saying the wrong thing. But in the beginning, he was a pretty awful jerk with sketchy greased-back hair who fake-fired employees for a laugh. Who could have guessed that by his final episode, we'd be crying not to see the dorky, oh-so-big-hearted (well, to everyone but Toby) guy go? Michael was just someone who wanted to be loved and give love, and layer by layer we got to see that truth reveal itself. Explain to us again why Steve Carell doesn't have an Emmy?   Pam Beesly  At the start of The Office, Pam was just the nice girl next door (or the girl next cubicle) engaged to a big lunk named Roy, letting the real love of her life (Jim) and her passions (painting) slip away. But Pam became a powerhouse, taking back her fate by dumping Roy, following her dreams (she briefly traded Scranton for art school in New York City), and finally saying "yes" to Jim. Not to mention the fact that she went from mousy wallflower to full-on babe when she started dating Halpert.  Phyllis Lapin When we met Phyllis she was a sweet and quiet office fixture, but not much more than Angela and Michael's meek punching bag. Eventually, Phyllis put Angela in her place and could fire back zingers at Michael like the best of them. Plus, Phyllis was the first one to truly find love at Dunder Mifflin, and her marriage to Bob Vance (Vance Refrigeration) is still going strong.  Andy Bernard  If we fell in love with Michael Scott over time, then we did just the opposite of Andy. He started as an annoying, angry, but ultimately harmless preppy transfer from the Stamford branch, but we've seen Andy manically and frequently bounce from a well-meaning lovelorn guy to a local musical theater hopeful to a full-fledged a**hole of a boss. Andy was always easy pickins, but now everyone has a reason to hate him.  Kelly Kapoor  Transforming her from the quiet, poorly dressed office drone to the fast-talking and fashionable Kelly we came to know and love, The Office writers pulled a total 180 on us with this one. In the first season (and a little bit into the second), Kelly was not only missing her Valley Girl accent, but she was nearly Pam-like: quiet and smart and dressed like a school marm. Thankfully, they went in the different direction of the boy crazy, Netflix-explaining, fashion-show-at-lunch enthusiast that became Kelly. She was way more fun over time.  The Office retrospective and series finale airs at 8 PM/ET on NBC.  Follow Aly on Twitter @AlySemigran More: The 10 Best (and 5 Worst) Episodes of 'The Office' 'The Office' Series Finale: Retrospective, Guest Stars, and MoreSteve Carell is Returning for the Series Finale of 'The Office' From Our Partners:Zoe Saldana Strips Down For Magazine (Celebuzz)33 Child Stars: Where Are They Now? (Celebuzz)
  • New CBS Trailers: Star Power Drives 'The Hostages,' 'The Crazy Ones,' and 'Mom'
    By: Aly Semigran May 15, 2013
    Men, moms, and a mini-series are just some of what CBS has in store for viewers this fall. The top-rated network had their upfront presentation at Carnegie Hall on Wednesday and rolled out the trailers for their new shows. Some looked very good (hello, The Hostages!) and some, well, make us sadder for Will Arnett than Up All Night ever did (The Millers).  The network seems to be staying close to their current formula of bawdy comedies (We Are Men could just as easily be called We Are Two and a Half Men) and glossy procedurals starring Lost alums (Intelligence). But, hey, if it ain't broke, don't fix it. CBS is also going heavy on star power in the 2013 fall season, nabbing the likes of Robin Williams, Kelly Clarkson, and Sarah Michelle Gellar. All on the same show, no less.  Here are the previews for all the new CBS series and our first impressions of them. Hopefully the network will release the inspired Les Mis parody they did with the cast of How I Met Your Mother in which they croon "One Year More." Seriously legendary.  The HostagesHow they'll turn this into an entire series, we have no idea, but we're already hooked. This intense drama, centered around a doctor (the great Toni Collette) unwillingly put in a Presidential assassination plot by a baddie (Dylan McDermott), looks like a truly well-made thriller.  The Crazy OnesRobin Williams, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Kelly Clarkson, and James Wolk all shill for McDonalds. Wait, is this why Bob Benson is at Sterling Cooper? He's a mole! IntelligenceJosh Holloway has the Internet in his brain, or something. Poor guy. It's going to be mostly Lost spoilers in there. Mom Joining CBS' Mom-day night lineup (get it?!) is the latest from Chuck Lorre, in which Anna Faris plays a recovering alcoholic single mother. Yes, it's a comedy. But, hey, the always-great Allison Janney is there, so that's something.  We Are MenThey are men. Two of those men are Tony Shaloub and Jerry O'Connell and they say and do crass things because, you know, they are men. CBS knows where their bread is buttered.    The Millers Sadly, this isn't a spin-off of Margo Martindale's New Girl Miller mama, rather a new comedy in which she plays Will Arnett's mom who farts a lot. Beau Bridges and JB Smoove star in it as well. They do not appear to be farting.  Under the DomeNot quite as funny as The Simpsons movie, but Dean Norris is there so that's awesome! Spielberg is bringing the mini-series adaptation of Stephen King's classic story to the small screen this June.   More: CBS Fall 2013 Schedule: Comedies Dominate, But 'Mike & Molly' Shifted to Midseason Fox Fall 2013 Schedule: 'Dads', 'Sleepy Hollow', and More!A Sneak Peek at ABC's New Fall Shows   From Our Partners:Zoe Saldana Strips Down For Magazine (Celebuzz)33 Child Stars: Where Are They Now? (Celebuzz)
  • 'Saturday Night Live' Promo: Ben Affleck Makes Bill Hader Lose His S**t
    By: Aly Semigran May 15, 2013
    One of the great joys of watching Bill Hader on Saturday Night Live over the past few years is witnessing the seasoned pro lose his s**t during certain segments. (SNL writer John Mulaney was the best at making that happen). While there's a pretty solid chance we'll see Stefon's giggly swan song this weekend (this episode will, sadly, mark Hader's last at SNL), someone already has Hader in stitches: host Ben Affleck. Don't be so surprised, the Oscar-winning actor/director is a seriously hilarious dude. If his turns in Kevin Smith's movies weren't proof enough, the Argo star is joining the elite five-timers club thanks to his solid turns on SNL (I'm just sad Mango isn't around anymore for his return).  Affleck and Hader have awesome chemistry in the new promo for this weekend's season finale episode (which features Kanye West as the musical guest, so you better believe this will be a can't-miss hour-and-a-half of television). Trust me, you Argo-ing to laugh. Benny Boy and his fake beard will host the season finale of SNL this Saturday at 11:30 PM/ET on NBC.  More: Bill Hader is Leaving 'Saturday Night Live'  'Saturday Night Live' Recap: Kristen Wiig Deserved BetterBen Affleck To Join Five-Timers 'SNL' Host Club  From Our Partners:Zoe Saldana Strips Down For Magazine (Celebuzz)33 Child Stars: Where Are They Now? (Celebuzz)  
  • CBS Fall 2013 Schedule: Comedies Dominate, 'Mike & Molly' Moves to Midseason
    By: Aly Semigran May 15, 2013
    Despite the Emmy-winning star power of Melissa McCarthy, CBS announced at their upfront on Wednesday that they have bumped her comedy Mike & Molly to midseason. That's the bad news. The good news is that the series has a full 22-episode order from the network. But that isn't the only shake-up happening to the CBS schedule: the drama Person of Interest will now move to Tuesdays, Hawaii Five-0 surfs on over to Fridays, and the network assured there will be fewer reruns in the fall.   Still, the name of the game in the schedule is comedy. Monday and Tuesday nights will both have two-hour comedy blocks that kick off with two of their biggest hits, How I Met Your Mother and The Big Bang Theory, respectively.  Check out the full schedule with all the new(*) series and returning favorites below and check back later for the trailers of the upcoming shows.  Monday8 PM How I Met Your Mother8:30 PM We Are Men*9 PM 2 Broke Girls9:30 PM Mom*10 PM. Hostages* (beginning in January), Intelligence* (beginning in May) Tuesday8 PM NCIS9 PM NCIS: Los Angeles10 PM Person of Interest Wednesday8 PM Survivor9 PM Criminal Minds10 PM CSI Thursday8 PM The Big Bang Theory8:30 PM The Millers*9 PM The Crazy Ones*9:30 PM Two and a Half Men10 PM Elementary Friday8 PM Undercover Boss9 PM Hawaii 5-010 PM Blue Bloods Sunday8 PM The Amazing Race9 PM The Good Wife10 PM The Mentalist More: A Sneak Peek at ABC's New Fall Shows  Fox Fall 2013 Schedule: 'Dads', 'Sleepy Hollow', and More!PBS Announces Season 4 of 'Downton Abbey' Will Debut in January 2014  From Our Partners:Zoe Saldana Strips Down For Magazine (Celebuzz)33 Child Stars: Where Are They Now? (Celebuzz)