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Meghan Linsey urges country stars to point out Nashville predators

Outspoken singer Meghan Linsey has urged her fellow country stars to speak out about abuse and harassment and shine a light on the seedy side of Nashville, Tennessee.
Last year (16) Linsey took to Facebook and revealed she had been groped by “a very powerful man in the music business” who then threatened to end her career when she spurned his unwanted attention, and she has been watching movie mogul Harvey Weinstein’s fall from grace with interest after he was accused by countless actresses of sexual assault and harassment.
And she now thinks it’s high time for country music’s stars to take aim at the industry’s predators.
“It (initial report of the groping) was very mixed reviews a year ago, and part of that was the reason I didn’t come out with the name (of my attacker),” she tells BuzzFeed News.
Linsey is still refusing to name names, but she is hoping more women come forward with sordid tales of life behind the scenes.
“I hope that people start to open their eyes to it and see what’s going on,” she says. “Country music is so hush-hush about everything. It’s so much harder to speak out.”
She insists there are sexual predators throughout country music, and she took aim at disgraced publicist Kirt Webster, who has lost clients like Kid Rock this week after another former client went public with allegations suggesting Webster molested and sexually assaulted him. Webster denied the allegations.
“When you have a person like that, who everybody kind of knows, and nobody says anything…,” Linsey adds. “People do dismiss it, and they go, ‘Well, he’s so important, he works with all these people’. I hope that people start to open their eyes to it and see what’s going on… This business is so small. It’s such a small town.”
Meghan recently hit the headlines when she took a knee after singing the national anthem during a National Football League game in September (17) as part of a protest against police brutality.
She told the Washington Post, “My decision may hurt my career, but it was the only choice for me. This cause is more important than my record sales.”

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