Every Pixar Movie Has a Non-Pixar Equivalent

1
'Monsters University' Is 'Animal House'
'Monsters University' Is 'Animal House'
Pixar; Universal Pictures
We all love Pixar. Their movies thrill and delight us with heartwarming sentiment and laugh-out-loud comedy. But sometimes, the plots seem a little bit familiar. Take the newest release, Monsters University, for example. Nerds team up with goof-offs in a wacky college comedy that results in unconstrained high jinks at the expense of a domineering dean? Sounds a bit like Animal House to us.
2
'Cars' Is 'Doc Hollywood'
'Cars' Is 'Doc Hollywood'
Pixar; Warner Bros. Pictures
Pixar's first real quality hiccup, 2006's Cars, landed a spotlit hotshot in a small town for a brief period of time, where he learned a few things about humility and friendship. In other words, it's pretty much exactly Michael J. Fox's Doc Hollywood.
3
'Finding Nemo' Is 'Rain Man'
'Finding Nemo' Is 'Rain Man'
Disney/Pixar; United Artists
Director Barry Levinson snagged Best Picture for his 1988 drama Rain Man, which sent the neurotic narcissist Tom Cruise off on a cross-country trip with his estranged brother, an autistic savant, who would prove to become his biggest challenge and most valuable companion. Fifteen years later, Pixar told the same story, when it sent finned father Marlin off on a seafaring quest with mentally debilitated Dory. All the beats are the same, right down to some episodic run-ins with kooky rubes along the way.
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4
'Up' Is 'The Wizard of Oz'
'Up' Is 'The Wizard of Oz'
Pixar; Warner Bros. Pictures
When you think about it, Dororthy and Carl Fredericksen are one and the same: Threatened with losing something of value (her dog/his house), they set off on an airborne adventure to a vast, fantastical location, compiling a collection of oddball cronies (the Scarecrow, Tin Man, and Cowardly Lion/boy scout Russell, Dug the talking dog, and Kevin the ostrich-thing) and avoiding the wrath of a maniacal hermit and his or her flying mammals.
5
'A Bug's Life' Is 'Seven Samurai'
'A Bug's Life' Is 'Seven Samurai'
Pixar; Columbia Pictures
When a humble village faces the imminent wrath of a malicious criminal army, a ragtag collection of do-gooders must band together to fight for justice and humanity. So are we talking about A Bug's Life or Seven Samurai? Because it can pretty much go either way.
6
'The Incredibles' Is 'You Only Live Twice'
'The Incredibles' Is 'You Only Live Twice'
Pixar; United Artists
Bob Parr goes underground as an everyday civilian, James Bond does so by faking his own death. Bob Parr resurfaces to take on the villainous Syndrome on the island of Nomanisan, James Bond resurfaces to take on the villainous Blofeld and his SPECTRE Corporation. The kicker: volcano lairs in both movies. And strikingly similar score, too.
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7
'WALL-E' Is '2001: A Space Odyssey'
'WALL-E' Is '2001: A Space Odyssey'
Pixar; MGM
From its wordless opening act to its parable about the inherent dangers of an omnipotent supercomputer, WALL-E is so reminiscent of 2001: A Space Odyssey that you half expect someone to mutter, "I'm afraid I can't do that, EVE."
8
'Monsters, Inc.' Is 'Brazil'
'Monsters, Inc.' Is 'Brazil'
Pixar; Universal Pictures
Wait a minute — are you telling me that the all-encompassing mega-corporation for which we work has been compromised by a tiny toxic interloper, and we've got to stop at nothing to fix everything before the sledgehammer that is our society rains down upon us? Well, you certainly are if this is Brazil ... or Monsters, Inc., for that matter.
9
'Ratatouille' Is 'The Pianist'
'Ratatouille' Is 'The Pianist'
Pixar; Focus Features
One might take issue with the comparison of a children's film about a cooking rat with the heart-wrenching story of a Polish Jew fleeing the wrath of the Nazis during the Holocaust. But the beautiful tale that is Ratatouille bears a lot of similarities to Roman Polanski's The Pianist. Both center on heroes with a hidden but insurmountable artistic skill. A young man (or rat) whose race (or species) is demonized and persecuted by tyrannical ruling bodies, but who has managed to earn a friend belonging to aforesaid ruling body, and whose beautiful skill is what ultimately saves him from as dark a fate as imaginable. Duly touching stories, the both of them.
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10
'Brave' Is 'Star Wars'
'Brave' Is 'Star Wars'
Pixar; LucasFilm
This one might seem like the biggest stretch, but think about it. Star Wars is a traditional fantasy adventure about a youngster who wishes, wholly, to change his fate and become far grander than his humble beginnings might have allowed. However, his journeys eventually escalate him to a shocking revelation: his father is the evil against which he has been fighting all this time. Now, substitute "humble beginnings" for "gender" and "father" for "mother" and you've got Brave. And Ewoks are pretty much bears, right?
11
'Toy Story' Is 'Midnight Cowboy'
'Toy Story' Is 'Midnight Cowboy'
Disney/Pixar; United Artists
Everybody's talkin' at me. Can't hear a word they're sayin'. Because... I'm made of plastic. Yes, one is about children's toys and one is about gigolos. Yes, one is a family-friendly comedy and the other stands as the only X-rated Oscar winner to date. But think about the movies at hand: a thick-headed newbie soars into town, thinking he knows everything there is to know about his new home, earning the scorn of a sour has-been who — through a long string of perilous hardships — winds up becoming his closest friend. Fortunately for Woody and Buzz, Toy Story sees the heroes make it all the way to their coveted destination of Andy's house. Midnight Cowboy doesn't exactly treat its heroes so kindly...

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