15 Sci-Fi Sex Scenes

1
Star Trek (1966)
Star Trek (1966)
CBS
Now, there had been some sex in sci-fi before Trek, but Gene Roddenberry's series boldly went where no interstellar lovemaking had gone before. Captain Kirk cuddled space babes regardless of class, race, or even species, and played a big role in the sexual revolution of the 1960s. His insatiable libido also explains odd episode titles like "What Are Little Girls Made Of?" where he even romanced a comely android named Andrea (Sherry Jackson). {CBS}
2
Star Trek: Amok Time (1967)
Star Trek: Amok Time (1967)
CBS
Compared to Kirk, who racked up at least a couple dozen conquests over the Original Series’ 79 episodes, Spock recorded relatively few notches on his Starfleet-issue belt. However, Spock's sexuality provided the basis for one of the most memorable eps, “Amok Time,” in which he undergoes the Pon Farr, the overwhelming Vulcan urge to mate every seven years. Rather than having sex, he cures himself by fighting Kirk—the stuff slash fiction is made of. This is his horny face. {CBS}
3
Barbarella (1968)
Barbarella (1968)
Paramount
Barbarella was arguably the first sci-fi saga to take the Y-chromosome out of the equation and focus specifically on a woman's needs. Jane Fonda is a space ranger who hops in and out of beds across the galaxy and encounters members of the opposite sex with names like Dildano. It climaxes with her torture in the Excessive Machine, which is supposed to kill her by "playing" her like the finely-tuned instrument she is. But instead of dying, when it crescendos, so does she. {Paramount Pictu
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4
The Man Who Fell From Earth (1976)
The Man Who Fell From Earth (1976)
Columbia Pictures
David Bowie finds that Earth girls really are easy as a wandering alien who visits our planet. But this is no teen comedy — it's a brooding existential reverie from '70s noggin-scrambler Nicolas Roeg. Bowie's alien is on some kind of quest and ends up acquiring knowledge about humanity by knowing, in the Biblical sense, Candy Clark, who he seems to be smothering in this freeze-frame from the film. {Columbia Pictures}
5
Saturn 3 (1980)
Saturn 3 (1980)
Associated Film Distribution
Kirk Douglas was really eager to make this bit of post-Star Wars space schlock, but probably just because it would allow him to schtup Farrah Fawcett onscreen. Though Fawcett was 30 years his junior, it's not as creepy as it sounds. Probably because Douglas, even at 63, had a prizefighter's physique. Also, Harvey Keitel stays dressed during a three-way tryst with Fawcett and Douglas, marking the first time he's ever not been nude on film. {Associated Film Distribution}
6
Cat People (1982)
Cat People (1982)
Universal Pictures
Jacques Tourneur's original 1942 horror flick locates its terror in a young bride's fear of her own sexuality. If she has sex, she'll turn into a panther! In Paul Schrader's kinky remake, Natassja Kinski is not nearly as repressed as evidenced by her feral lovemaking with John Heard. Meow! {Universal Pictures}
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7
Starman (1984)
Starman (1984)
Columbia Pictures
You've just arrived on Earth. You look like Jeff Bridges. You meet Karen Allen. Are you seriously not going to hook up? Do we even have to ask the question? When they finally speak to each other in the interstellar language, via a tryst in a boxcar, it's like what happens when matter and antimatter collide: explosive. {Columbia}
8
Cocoon (1985)
Cocoon (1985)
20th Century Fox
Ron Howard's film served up the first great pool-set sci-fi sex scene. Tahnee Welch's alien can only have psychic sex, involving an enveloping glow that surrounds both parties, but, believe me, we'll take it. Was it as good for Steve Guttenberg as it was for her? He wasn't complaining...and neither are we. After all, the brain is the biggest erogenous zone. {20th Century Fox}
9
Demolition Man (1993)
Demolition Man (1993)
Warner Bros.
Sylvester Stallone and Sandra Bullock pull a Cocoon and have psychic sex by staring at each other from across a room. Which is pretty much the only way we'd ever want to see Stallone and Bullock having sex. {Warner Bros. Pictures}
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10
Species (1995)
Species (1995)
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Like Tahnee Welch before her, Natasha Henstridge also takes a dip in a swimming pool to seduce an earthling. But unlike Tahnee, she gets much more physical. {MGM}
11
Star Trek: First Contact (1996)
Star Trek: First Contact (1996)
CBS
Formerly at the cutting edge of nerdy sexuality, Star Trek became a little more tame in its Next Generation incarnation. That is, until First Contact, when the Borg Queen (Alice Krige, under eight hours worth of makeup) tried to lure Data to the Collective by having him embrace his human side, i.e. by giving him "favors." No wonder he considered joining the Borg for 0.68 seconds. {Paramount}
12
Battlestar Galactica (2003)
Battlestar Galactica (2003)
SyFy
Creator Ronald D. Moore cut his teeth by co-writing First Contact, so he already knew a thing or two about spacebound sexy times when he rebooted Battlestar Galactica for Syfy. This time, his flesh-and-blood androids, the Cylons, were decidedly more alluring than the Borg Queen—except for Dean Stockwell. For an extra thrill, when Cylon Tricia Helfer or Cylon Grace Park make sex their spines glow red! {Syfy}
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13
Supernova (2000)
Supernova (2000)
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
In space, no one can hear you scream...unless it's the screams from James Spader and Angela Bassett having sex that burns with the heat of an exploding star. {MGM}
14
Avatar (2009)
Avatar (2009)
20th Century Fox
The Na'vi aren't mammals. But director James Cameron still devised a way for them to get up close and personal. They can entangle their long braids of hair and tap directly into each other's nervous systems for the ultimate stimulation. Yeah, I don't get it either. {20th Century Fox}
15
Moonraker (1979)
Moonraker (1979)
United Artists
As a comical sub-genre of the sci-fi sex scene there's also the zero-gravity sex scene. Surprisingly there haven't been that many. Maybe because it'd be impossible to top the ending of Moonraker, where Q observes Roger Moore's 007 in flagrante delicto with Lois Chiles' Dr. Holly Goodhead and delivers the immortal line, "I believe he's attempting reentry, sir." {United Artists}

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