Vince Vaughn Revives ‘Rockford Files’ for Frat Pack Fans

Vince VaughnOne of the constituents of being a big-time comedic movie actor is a childhood spent in large part in front of a television set. TV inspires, challenges and, eventually, gives you something to adapt into a feature film. Vince Vaughn is the latest member of the Frat Pack to bring an old TV staple the theaters: he’ll be starring in the big screen adaptation of The Rockford Files, which is being set forth by Universal Pictures.

The original Rockford Files series ran from 1974 to 1980, and starred James Garner as laid-back private detective/ex-con Jim Rockford. David Levien and Brian Koppleman (Rounders, Runaway Jury, Ocean’s Thirteen) are handling the script.

Vaughn is joining some of his colleagues in the act of revitalizing a cop serial in big screen form. Vaughn had a villainous part in the 2004 revival of Starsky and Hutch, led by Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson. A more recent example is Jonah Hill’s 21 Jump Street. Interestingly, Vaughn, Stiller and Hill all star in the upcoming science fiction comedy Neighborhood Watch. This leads many to wonder when Richard Ayoade will be starring in a B.J. and the Bear remake.

Vaughn is not a bad pick to play the schmoozing, one-step-ahead character that Garner created. And in any event, this is just another excuse to listen to the catchiest theme song in television history…

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[Deadline]

Staff editor Michael Arbeiter’s natural state of being can best be described as “mild panic attack.” His earliest memories of growing up in Queens, New York, involve nighttime conversations with a voice from his bedroom wall (the jury’s still out on what that was all about) and a love for classic television that spawned from the very first time he was allowed to watch “The Munsters.” Attending college at SUNY Binghamton, a 20-year-old Michael learned two things: that he could center his future on this love for TV and movies, and that dragons never actually existed — he was kind of late in the game on that one.

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