DarkMode/LightMode
Light Mode

‘Women’s Murder Club’: Investigating the Disastrously Single Detective Angie Harmon

[IMG:L]Think Sex & the City meets CSI and you’ll have a pretty good idea of the tone of the new ABC police series Women’s Murder Club (but no, the cadavers aren’t wearing Manolo Blaniks), based on the bestselling series of novels by author James Patterson. Angie Harmon stars at the center of a quartet of gal pals who just happen to all work in the homicide-solving biz (she’s a cop, her cohorts are a forensic scientist, a D.A. and a crime beat reporter), sharing as many secrets about DNA evidence as they do their love lives.

In person, Harmon couldn’t be further from the determined Det. Lindsay Boxer, who handles murder mysteries far better then her romantic entanglements: she’s the happily married wife of NFL quarterback Jason Sehorn and devoted mom to daughters Finley and Avery. Harmon sat down with Hollywood.com and gave us the rap sheet on keeping her family centered.

Hollywood.com: After playing Abbie Carmichael for three seasons on Law & Order, did you hesitate to tackle a new woman in law enforcement on a weekly TV series?
Angie Harmon:
No, because this is a lot lighter. When you see the show, it has a Sex and the City vibe to it, it really does. The character has a lot of Carmichael in her, as far as that tenacity, that need for justice and the need for vindication and all that. Lindsay is the exact same way, except you see her backstory. That was what I was so thankful for. The writers have really, really captured her beautifully. When I say she is great at her job, you love to watch her break the crime scene down and do what she has. Then when you see her in her life you are just like “Oh, this poor woman.” She just can’t get it together in her life…That is what is fun about it, there are men that keep coming in and out of this woman’s life. You keep thinking “Oh maybe she’ll get it this time!” Maybe it will come to fruition and it just doesn’t.

- Advertisement -

HW: Lindsay Boxer’s life is definitely complicated in the debut episode. How will the show continue to show the impact of her professional life on her personal life?
AH:
There is a serial killer that has wanted her and that got away from her. She was just obsessed with him–that’s actually what kind of ended her marriage. He sort of resurfaces, so it’s all about her vindication of getting him. This isn’t like “Oh this is a situation that I really should have handled, and gotten in front of.” People are being murdered, so it’s very deep-rooted with her. Then it’s all about the characters that come in as that story unfolds. That is what I love about everything. There are a lot of stories that end episodically, but there are arcs–we’ll have a character with a six-episode arc, and I don’t think there is anything wrong with that. I think that is fun, especially with TiVo now. You don’t actually have to watch an episode if you have TiVo. It’s a whole new market business right now.

[IMG:R]HW: You’re a working wife and mother, and while the show has an ensemble element, your character is clearly the anchor. Did the producers make any accommodations to your schedule to suit your family needs?
AH:
It’s kind of the same work schedule. It’s still like a 90-hour week. My husband is very conscientious of bringing the girls to the set and of keeping us all together. My biggest worry is that they don’t get bored and want to leave. For the first probably week or so it was “Yay, we’re going to Mommy’s work!” And now it’s kind of like “Grumble.” So that’s really my biggest fear is that they don’t get bored and they want to stay there.

HW: You were very happily settled in Texas with your husband and daughters, but you’ve recently uprooted the clan to settle in L.A. full-time. How’d that decision come about?
AH:
What had happened was that I was pregnant and then doing movies. It was easy to stay in Texas and be anchored there. Once I decided to come back and do [the 2005 TV series] Inconceivable then that was the kind of thing where, all right we’ll just get a place there. Then Inconceivable rolled into other projects and then this one came along. It was like “You know what? It seems like God is just putting us here, and putting us here for a reason.”

HW: Was it a difficult or painful decision to leave Dallas, where you and your girls were born?
AH:
Because of the girls, it is just hard to travel–they are young. They are 3 and 2 years old. With the schedule and things it’s been hard. We’re trying to get back. My parents are there, a lot of my family is there, and all of my friends from high school are there. They all have kids that are my daughters’ age. When you think about that bond it’s like friends from high school, they have kids that are now your kids’ age, and you want them all to grow up the way we did. It’s been hard. I think I had the girls so close together so I was pregnant, had the baby, and then–bam!–pregnant again. That is obviously going to do something to you. You obviously want to stay anchored in your home. You want to stay anchored in the things that are familiar. My girls have been in that house, and for my oldest it was the only house she knew. It was the house she was growing up in. I wasn’t ready to yank her out of that to go because Mommy is doing a TV show. Now they are both older, they are more stable, they now have spent enough time in their lives in the house we are in now. They have had their Christmases there, they have had their traditions there, and this is their home now. So, now watch: I’m going to book something in New York. [Laughs] No, this [show] is going to go forever.

HW: Did you keep your home in Texas?
AH:
No. It was awful. It was tough. Jason [Sehorn] was building his dream house there. He was building his dream house, designed the whole thing, and yeah we sold it. We have a wonderful place here and it’s fantastic. We’re not stalked by the paparazzi. My children don’t see that, they don’t get any of that, and it’s good.

HW: Is that something that gave you pause about bringing the family back to L.A. full-time?
AH:
I find the paparazzi … they terrify me. I don’t need them chasing me to validate me as an actress. You see those pictures of actresses carrying their children and their children are burying their heads, they are terrified, and that’s not for me. I’m not going to put my children through that. Plus, I have a very large husband.

- Advertisement -

[IMG:L]HW: After six years of marriage and two kids, how do you and Jason keep the romance alive?
AH:
We have a date night. Once a week. It’s mandatory. It is easier for us–we are blessed, in a way. Jason only works 16 weeks a year so he is home. He is with me and if I call, I’m having a bad day or whatever, he’s like “You want me to come down?” He’s available. We do dinner and a movie. Sometimes if we really haven’t seen each other in a while, at the end of the day we have to get a hotel room. [Laughs] We had make-up and hair tests, and I was like “Oh, we still have that on, should we just go there?” and we did. We literally went there, ordered room service, watched a movie–that’s all I’m going to say, and it was a lovely date night.

HW: Women’s Murder Club is produced by Joe Simpson, the father of Jessica and Ashlee. Are you tight with the Simpson clan now?
AH:
Oh yeah, absolutely. Us Texas people, we stick together. [Laughs] And you know, they are lovely girls and it’s a lovely family. Really, really, lovely.

Women’s Murder Club premieres Oct. 12 at 9/8c on ABC.

- Advertisement -