Woody Allen

Director, Actor, Comedian
With at least four distinct phases throughout his long career, writer-director-actor Woody Allen was one of the few American filmmakers rightly labeled an auteur. From the irreverent absurdity of his early satires like ... Read more »
Born: 12/01/1935 in Brooklyn, New York, USA

Filmography

Actor (75)

Trespassing Bergman 2015 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

David Blaine: Real or Magic 2013 - 2014 (TV Show)

Actor

Fading Gigolo 2014 (Movie)

Murray (Actor)

The 71st Annual Golden Globe Awards 2013 - 2014 (TV Show)

Actor

Paris Manhattan 2013 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

The Unbelievers 2013 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

To Rome With Love 2012 (Movie)

Jerry (Actor)

Woody Allen: A Documentary 2012 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

Casting By 2011 (Movie)

Interviewee (Actor)

Scoop 2006 (Movie)

Sid Waterman (Actor)

The Outsider 2006 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

100 Greatest Stand-Ups of All Time 2003 - 2004 (TV Show)

Actor

Francois Truffaut, An Autobiography 2004 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

100 Years of Hope and Humor 2002 - 2003 (TV Show)

Actor

Anything Else 2003 (Movie)

David Dobel (Actor)

Hollywood Ending 2002 (Movie)

Val Waxman (Actor)

The 74th Annual Academy Awards 2001 - 2002 (TV Show)

Actor

Company Man 2001 (Movie)

American Ambassador (Actor)

The Curse of the Jade Scorpion 2001 (Movie)

CW Briggs (Actor)

Fellini 2000 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

Picking Up the Pieces 2000 (Movie)

Tex Cowley (Actor)

Small Time Crooks 2000 (Movie)

Ray Winkler (Actor)

Ljuset Haller Mig Sallskap 1999 (Movie)

(Actor)

NYTV: By the People Who Made It 1998 - 1999 (TV Show)

Actor

Sweet and Lowdown 1999 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

AFI's 100 Years... 100 Movies 1997 - 1998 (TV Show)

Actor

Antz 1998 (Movie)

of Z (Voice)

Canned Ham: Deconstructing Harry 1997 - 1998 (TV Show)

Actor

Wild Man Blues 1998 (Movie)

Himself/On Clarinet (Actor)

Deconstructing Harry 1997 (Movie)

Harry Block (Actor)

Woody Allen: A to Z 1996 - 1997 (TV Show)

Actor

Everyone Says I Love You 1996 (Movie)

Joe (Actor)

Don't Drink the Water 1994 - 1995 (TV Show)

Actor

Mighty Aphrodite 1995 (Movie)

Lenny (Actor)

Manhattan Murder Mystery 1993 (Movie)

Larry Lipton (Actor)

Husbands and Wives 1992 (Movie)

Gabe Roth (Actor)

Shadows and Fog 1992 (Movie)

Kleinman (Actor)

Scenes From A Mall 1991 (Movie)

Nick (Actor)

Crimes and Misdemeanors 1989 (Movie)

Cliff Stern (Actor)

New York Stories 1989 (Movie)

Sheldon (Actor)

King Lear 1988 (Movie)

Mr Alien (Actor)

Storytellers: The PEN Celebration 1987 - 1988 (TV Show)

Actor

Radio Days 1987 (Movie)

Narration/Joe--as an Adult (Narrator)

Hannah and Her Sisters 1986 (Movie)

Mickey Sachs (Actor)

50 Years of Action! 1985 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

Broadway Danny Rose 1984 (Movie)

Danny Rose (Actor)

Zelig 1983 (Movie)

Leonard Zelig (Actor)

A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy 1982 (Movie)

Andrew (Actor)

Stardust Memories 1980 (Movie)

Sandy Bates (Actor)

Manhattan 1979 (Movie)

Isaac Davis (Actor)

To Woody Allen, From Europe With Love 1979 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

Annie Hall 1977 (Movie)

Alvy Singer (Actor)

Love and Death 1975 (Movie)

Boris (Actor)

The Front 1975 (Movie)

Howard Prince (Actor)

Sleeper 1973 (Movie)

Miles Monroe (Actor)

Play It Again, Sam 1972 (Movie)

Allan Felix (Actor)

Bananas 1971 (Movie)

Fielding Melish (Actor)

Hot Dog 1970 - 1971 (TV Show)

Actor

Plimpton! Did You Hear the One About...? 1970 - 1971 (TV Show)

Actor

Men of Crisis: The Harvey Wallinger Story 1970 (Movie)

Harvey Wallinger (Actor)

Take the Money and Run 1969 (Movie)

Virgil Starkwell (Actor)

Casino Royale 1967 (Movie)

Jimmy Bond (Actor)

What's Up Tiger Lily? 1966 (Movie)

voice dubbing (Voice)

What's Up Tiger Lily? 1966 (Movie)

Himself (Actor)

What's New, Pussycat? 1965 (Movie)

Victor Shakapopolis (Actor)

The Sunshine Boys (TV Show)

Actor

Woody Allen: A Life in Film (TV Show)

Actor
Writer (54)

Irrational Man 2015 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Magic in the Moonlight 2014 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Blue Jasmine 2013 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

To Rome With Love 2012 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Midnight in Paris 2011 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger 2010 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Whatever Works 2009 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Cassandra's Dream 2008 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Vicky Cristina Barcelona 2008 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Scoop 2006 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Match Point 2005 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Melinda and Melinda 2005 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Anything Else 2003 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Hollywood Ending 2002 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Curse of the Jade Scorpion 2001 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Small Time Crooks 2000 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Sweet and Lowdown 1999 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Celebrity 1998 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Deconstructing Harry 1997 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Everyone Says I Love You 1996 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Mighty Aphrodite 1995 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Bullets Over Broadway 1994 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Manhattan Murder Mystery 1993 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Husbands and Wives 1992 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Shadows and Fog 1992 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Alice 1990 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Crimes and Misdemeanors 1989 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

New York Stories 1989 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Another Woman 1988 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Radio Days 1987 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

September 1987 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Hannah and Her Sisters 1986 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Purple Rose of Cairo 1985 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Broadway Danny Rose 1984 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Zelig 1983 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy 1982 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Stardust Memories 1980 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Manhattan 1979 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Interiors 1978 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Annie Hall 1977 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Your Show of Shows 1976 - 1977 (TV Show)

Writer

Love and Death 1975 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Sleeper 1973 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Play It Again, Sam 1972 (Movie)

("Play It Again, Sam") (Play as Source Material)

Play It Again, Sam 1972 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Bananas 1971 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Men of Crisis: The Harvey Wallinger Story 1970 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

Don't Drink the Water 1969 (Movie)

("Don't Drink the Water") (Play as Source Material)

Take the Money and Run 1969 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

What's Up Tiger Lily? 1966 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

What's New, Pussycat? 1965 (Movie)

(Screenplay)

The Sid Caesar Show 1958 - 1959 (TV Show)

Writer

Your Show of Shows 1949 - 1954 (TV Show)

Writer
Director (48)

Irrational Man 2015 (Movie)

(Director)

Magic in the Moonlight 2014 (Movie)

(Director)

Blue Jasmine 2013 (Movie)

(Director)

To Rome With Love 2012 (Movie)

(Director)

Midnight in Paris 2011 (Movie)

(Director)

You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger 2010 (Movie)

(Director)

Whatever Works 2009 (Movie)

(Director)

Cassandra's Dream 2008 (Movie)

(Director)

Vicky Cristina Barcelona 2008 (Movie)

(Director)

Scoop 2006 (Movie)

(Director)

Match Point 2005 (Movie)

(Director)

Melinda and Melinda 2005 (Movie)

(Director)

Anything Else 2003 (Movie)

(Director)

Hollywood Ending 2002 (Movie)

(Director)

The Concert For New York City 2001 - 2002 (TV Show)

Segment Director

The Curse of the Jade Scorpion 2001 (Movie)

(Director)

Small Time Crooks 2000 (Movie)

(Director)

Sweet and Lowdown 1999 (Movie)

(Director)

Celebrity 1998 (Movie)

(Director)

Deconstructing Harry 1997 (Movie)

(Director)

Everyone Says I Love You 1996 (Movie)

(Director)

Mighty Aphrodite 1995 (Movie)

(Director)

Bullets Over Broadway 1994 (Movie)

(Director)

Manhattan Murder Mystery 1993 (Movie)

(Director)

Husbands and Wives 1992 (Movie)

(Director)

Shadows and Fog 1992 (Movie)

(Director)

Alice 1990 (Movie)

(Director)

Crimes and Misdemeanors 1989 (Movie)

(Director)

New York Stories 1989 (Movie)

("Oedipus Wrecks") (Director)

Another Woman 1988 (Movie)

(Director)

Radio Days 1987 (Movie)

(Director)

September 1987 (Movie)

(Director)

Hannah and Her Sisters 1986 (Movie)

(Director)

The Purple Rose of Cairo 1985 (Movie)

(Director)

Broadway Danny Rose 1984 (Movie)

(Director)

Zelig 1983 (Movie)

(Director)

A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy 1982 (Movie)

(Director)

Stardust Memories 1980 (Movie)

(Director)

Manhattan 1979 (Movie)

(Director)

Interiors 1978 (Movie)

(Director)

Annie Hall 1977 (Movie)

(Director)

Love and Death 1975 (Movie)

(Director)

Sleeper 1973 (Movie)

(Director)

Bananas 1971 (Movie)

(Director)

Take the Money and Run 1969 (Movie)

(Director)

What's Up Tiger Lily? 1966 (Movie)

(re-released version) (Director)
Music (4)

Deconstructing Harry 1997 (Movie)

("When the Red Red Robin Comes Bob Bob Bobbin' Along") (Song Performer)

Everyone Says I Love You 1996 (Movie)

("I'm Thru With Love") (Song Performer)

Sleeper 1973 (Movie)

(Performer)

Sleeper 1973 (Movie)

(Music)
Producer (2)

Hotel Terminus: Klaus Barbie, His Life and Times 1988 (Movie)

funding (Producer)

What's Up Tiger Lily? 1966 (Movie)

(Associate Producer)
Other (5)

The 69th Annual Academy Awards 1996 - 1997 (TV Show)

Archival Footage

The 67th Annual Academy Awards 1994 - 1995 (TV Show)

Archival Footage

The 66th Annual Academy Awards Presentation 1993 - 1994 (TV Show)

Archival Footage

Escape From the "Liberty" Cinema 1991 (Movie)

(Special Thanks)

What's Up Tiger Lily? 1966 (Movie)

special material (Other)

Biography

With at least four distinct phases throughout his long career, writer-director-actor Woody Allen was one of the few American filmmakers rightly labeled an auteur. From the irreverent absurdity of his early satires like "Bananas" (1971) and "Sleepers" (1973) to his chronicles of neurotic New Yorkers in "Annie Hall" (1977), "Manhattan" (1979) and "Hannah and Her Sisters" (1986), Allen's obsessions with beauty, psychiatry, intellect and relationships existed in all his work. Unique among filmmakers, Allen made highly personal films with mainstream money while managing to exert creative control over the product - all the while earning a high-level of critical respect and numerous Academy Awards. By keeping budgets low, the prolific filmmaker reached his mostly urban audience on a regular basis, churning out one movie practically each year. His creative fires never extinguished, as he directed dramas like "Interiors" (1978), morally ambiguous tragicomedies like "Crimes and Misdemeanors" (1989) and period comedies like "Bullets Over Broadway" (1994). Even when stepping outside of his comfort zone with "Everyone Says I Love You" (1996) and "Sweet and Lowdown" (1999), Allen had the creative acumen to pull it off. Though he suffered personal scandal over his romantic involvement with adopted daughter, Soon Yi Previn, as well as a professional nadir with "Small Time Crooks" (2000) and "The Curse of the Jade Scorpion" (2001), Allen regained his critical stature with "Match Point" (2005), "Vicky Cristina Barcelona" (2008) and "Midnight In Paris" (2011), which cemented his place in cinema history as one of its finest directors.

Relationships

Bechet Allen

Daughter
Born c. 1999 in China Adopted with Soon-Yi Previn; named after jazz clarinetist Sidney Bechet;

Manzie Allen

Daughter
Born in 2000 (c. February) reportedly in Texas Adopted with Soon-Yi Previn; named after jazz musicians Manzie Johnson and Lorenzo Tio

Letty Aronson Producer

Sister
Born in 1943; worked at the Museum of Television and Radio; later became a vice president of Sweetland Films, with which Allen signed in July 1993

Mia Farrow Actor

Companion
Introduced in 1979 by Michael Caine Began relationship in 1980 Separated in 1992 after Farrow discovered nude photographs of her adopted daughter Soon-Yi Previn taken by Allen; he admitted to a romantic involvement with Previn that reportedly began in 1990 Farrow accused Allen of molesting Dylan/Eliza; Farrow cut off his contact with child in 1992; after protracted court battles, Allen was denied custody of his natural son and his "adopted" children Dylan and Moses; he married Previn in 1997

Malone Farrow

Daughter
Born c. 1985 as Dylan Adopted with Mia Farrow Asked to change her name to Eliza June in 1993; later adopted name Malone

Moses Farrow

Son
Born c. 1979 Adopted with Mia Farrow; Korean; suffered from cerebral palsy; changed name to Misha

Seamus Farrow

Son
Born Dec. 19, 1987 in New York; mother, Mia Farrow; named after baseball pitcher Satchel Page; name changed to Seamus by Farrow

Diane Keaton Actor

Companion
Together for much of the 1970s; lived together for three years Allen directed Keaton in five films during their relationship including "Sleeper" (1973), "Annie Hall" (1977) and "Manhattan" (1979)

Martin Konigsberg

Father
Born in December 1900 Died Jan. 8, 2001 at age 100

Netty Konigsberg

Mother
Born c. 1906 Died in January 2002 at age 95

Louise Lasser Actor

Wife
Married Feb. 2, 1966 Divorced in January 1970 Appeared in Allen's "Bananas" (1971)

Stacey Nelkin Actor

Companion
Reportedly had relationship when she was a teenager around the time of the filming of "Annie Hall" (1977); thought to be model for character played by Mariel Hemingway in "Manhattan" (1979); she later married actor Barry Bostwick from 1987-91

Soon Yi Previn Actor

Wife
Born Oct. 8, 1970; adopted by Mia Farrow and conductor Andre Previn during the 1970s While still with Farrow it was revealed that Allen and her adopted daughter Soon-Yi were having a relationship Married on Dec. 23, 1997 in Venice, Italy

Harlene Rosen

Wife
Married March 15, 1956 Divorced November 1962

EDUCATION

New York University

New York , New York 1953
Attended for one semester

Midwood High School

Brooklyn , New York

Milestones

2012

Wrote and directed an ensemble cast in the romantic comedy "To Rome with Love"; also acted in his first film since 2006's "Scoop"

2011

Directed "Midnight in Paris," his first feature shot entirely in Paris; starred Owen Wilson, Rachel McAdams, and Kathy Bates

2010

Earned a Grammy nomination for Best Spoken Word for the album, The Woody Allen Collection: Mere Anarchy, Side Effects, Without Feathers, Getting Even

2010

Wrote and directed his fourth film shot in London, "You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger"

2009

Returned to New York with the offbeat comedy "Whatever Works," starring Larry David

2008

Directed first film in Spain, "Vicky Cristina Barcelona"; once again collaborated with Scarlett Johansson

2008

Directed "Gianni Schicchi," the comic third part of Puccini's "Trittico" in Los Angeles

2008

Directed Colin Farrell and Ewan McGregor in "Cassandra's Dream"

2006

Once again directed Scarlett Johansson in the comedy "Scoop"; also wrote and co-starred

2005

Directed (also wrote and starred in) "Melinda and Melinda," a comedic storyline which is one of two (one comic and one tragic) that revolve around the titular character played by Radha Mitchell

2005

Helmed the dark themed "Match Point," starring Scarlett Johansson and Jonathan Rhys-Meyers; the first four films under the DreamWorks SKG banner and first film shot in England; earned Golden Globe nominations for Directing and Screenplay

2004

Helmed the play "A Second Hand Memory" at the Atlantic Theater Company

2003

Directed (also wrote and co-starred in) the comedy "Anything Else," starring Christina Ricci and Jason Biggs

2002

Wrote, directed and starred in "Hollywood Ending"

2001

Helmed (also wrote) "The Curse of the Jade Scorpion"

2000

Wrote and directed the comedy "Small Time Crooks"

2000

In March, signed distribution deal with DreamWorks

1999

Wrote and directed "Sweet and Lowdown," starring Sean Penn as a 1930s jazz guitarist

1998

Made unbilled cameo appearance in Stanley Tucci's film "The Imposters"

1998

Released his 30th film as director, "Celebrity"

1998

Voiced the characters of the worker ant Z in the DreamWorks-produced animated film "Antz"

1997

First film distributed by Fine Line, "Deconstructing Harry"; nominated for a Best Original Screenplay Oscar; Allen's 20th Academy Award nomination and 13th for screenwriting, making him the most nominated screenwriter in Academy history

1996

Co-starred with Peter Falk in TV remake of Neil Simon's "The Sunshine Boys" (CBS)

1995

Wrote, directed, and co-starred with Mira Sorvino and F. Murray Abraham in "Mighty Aphrodite"

1994

Had modest success with the period comedy "Bullets Over Broadway"

1994

Made rare TV acting appearance in small screen remake of "Don't Drink the Water" (ABC); also directed and wrote

1993

Completed a second film for TriStar, "Manhattan Murder Mystery" (reteaming him with Diane Keaton); ended multi-picture deal with the company; signed with Sweetland Films in July

1991

Signed deal with TriStar Pictures (September); began first film for them, "Husbands and Wives"

1991

Signed an agreement with Italy's National Association of Consumer Cooperatives (COOP) to write and direct of series of five TV commericials (his first); fee for the package rumored to be 3 million lire ($2.5 million)

1991

Co-starred with Bette Midler in Paul Mazursky's "Scenes from a Mall"

1987

Had cameo in Jean-Luc Godard's "King Lear"

1986

Won third Oscar for Best Original Screenplay for "Hannah and Her Sisters"

1982

First film with Mia Farrow, "A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy"

1981

Wrote the full-length stage comedy "The Floating Light Bulb"

1979

Last film opposite Diane Keaton for 14 years (except for her cameo in 1987's "Radio Days"), "Manhattan"

1978

Directed first film drama, "Interiors"

1977

Breakthrough film, "Annie Hall"; film won four Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director

1976

Rare acting appearance in a film which he did not direct, "The Front"

1972

First of six films opposite Diane Keaton, "Play It Again, Sam"

1970

Published first collection of comic material "Getting Even"

1969

Debut as TV series regular on the NBC children's show "Hot Dog"

1968

TV writing and acting debut with the short film, "Cupid's Shaft"

1968

Feature film directing debut (also screenwriter; actor), "Take the Money and Run"

1968

Headlined "Woody's First Special" (CBS) and "The Woody Allen Special" (NBC)

1968

Broadway acting debut in "Play It Again, Sam"; also playwright

1966

First play produced on Broadway, "Don't Drink the Water"

1966

Made feature film, "What's Up, Tiger Lily?" using existing footage of a Japanese film, creating new story by dubbing in voices

1965

Feature film acting and writing debut, "What's New Pussycat?"; helmed by Clive Donner

1964

First guest-host to replace Johnny Carson on "The Tonight Show" (NBC)

1960

Debut as stand-up comedian at The Blue Angel in NYC (October)

1960

Stage writing debut for revue, "From A to Z"

1955

Hired as a writer for "Your Show Of Shows" at age 19; began writing gags for Herb Shriner, Buddy Hackett and Art Carney

1953

After flunking out of NYU, joined the NBC Writer's Program; contributed to "The Colgate Comedy Hour"

Worked at a public relations firm supplying comedy material to Bob Hope and Arthur Murray

Became staff writer on "The Tonight Show" (NBC)

At age 15, began sending jokes to columnists Walter Winchell and Earl Wilson

Bonus Trivia

.

Allen played New Orleans jazz clarinet with his group, the New Orleans Funeral and Ragtime Orchestra, almost every Monday at Michael's Pub in New York since 1971 (and skipped the 1978 Oscar ceremonies so as not to miss a Monday night set).

.

Allen admitted to a variety of phobias, including Arachnophobia (spiders), Cynophobia (dogs), Acrophobia (heights) and Agoraphobia (fear of leaving safety of home). In fact, the neurotic character of George Costanza on "Seinfeld" (NBC) was originally planned to be a caricature of the filmmaker.

.

Allen and Mia Farrow separated in 1992 after she discovered nude photographs Allen had taken of her adopted daughter Soon-Yi Previn. After Allen and Farrow separated, a long public legal battle for the custody of their three children began. During the proceedings, Farrow alleged that Allen had sexually molested their adopted daughter Malone. The judge eventually concluded that the sex abuse charges were inconclusive, but called Allen's conduct with Malone "grossly inappropriate". Farrow ultimately won the custody battle over their children. Allen was denied visitation rights with Malone (Dylan) and could only see Ronan (Satchel) under supervision. Misha (Moses), who was then 14, chose not to see his father.

.

"I just keep my nose to the grindstone. I don't listen to people who criticize me, don't listen to them tell me my films are bad, or listen to people who tell me I'm a comic genius. I don't worry about getting rich or about what people say. I focus on the work with the same fanaticism that a Muslim fundamentalist might focus on religion. If I was giving advice to younger people, I would tell them to not listen to anything, not read what's written about you, don't listen to anybody, just focus on the work." – Allen quoted in New York's Daily News, Oct. 22, 1995

.

"I didn't want to play Bogart. I didn't want to play John Wayne. I wanted to be the schnook. The guy with the glasses who doesn't get the girl, who can't get the girl but who's amusing." – Allen to John Lahr in The New Yorker, Dec. 9, 1996

.

"Denis Hamill: What are your feelings toward Mia Farrow now?Woody Allen: I haven't had any contact with her for years. Although we've had our many conflicts, I have no further or lingering feelings about it. I wish her well. No, I haven't read her book, don't intend to. Not interested in the whole thing. To me, it's history. I know what happened and what she thinks. As it turned out, in that period of my life, more people that I care about became closer to me than became estranged. People I thought of as acquaintances became friends. Some rose to the occasion in heroic fashion for me. Which was great. My relationship with Soon-Yi is the best one of my life. So it wasn't all bad." – from Daily News, Oct. 5, 1997

.

"After the treadmill and breakfast, I lie down on the bed with a pad and pencil or pad and pen and write for two hours and then have a shower. Write for another two hours and break for lunch, Then write all afternoon. I could write all the time. I love to write. All I need are little breaks to practice the clarinet and to get a breath of fresh air. Then I can't wait to get back to it because I'm refreshed. I'd be happy to write all day and all night. If I didn't make movies, I could easily write four screenplays a year." – Allen to Denis Hamill in Daily News, Oct. 7, 1997

.

"I've been blessed. It's like fool's luck. From the day I made my first film, nobody at United Artists and then Orion expected anything. I've had nothing but support, freedom, final cut, nobody tells me who to cast. It's nothing that I did to earn it. It was given to me by magnanimous people." – Allen in conversation with Martin Scorsese, The New York Times magazine, Nov. 16, 1997

.

"Working with Woody is like holding a puppy. It's warm and nice, but you know if you hold on too long he's going to piss all over you." – an unnamed source quoted in Marion Meade's biography The Unruly Life of Woody Allen (Scribner's, 2000)

.

About his break up with Mia Farrow, Allen told London's The Daily Telegraph on March 18, 2002: "It was big and messy and it could have been handled better and had better consequences. But I didn't have any choice. I was put in that position and I had to respond. Normally I like to handle everything quietly and discreetly and I'm a, you know, a friendly and forgiving private type. But I will always...There are certain situations where you are forced to act.""It was a terrible, terrible, terrible situation. My not having access to the children is completely cruel and unfair. Not in their best interests. But these dreadful things happen in life. To balance that I had parents with good longevity [his father lived to 100, his mother was 95]. I've been healthy. I've been blessed with a talent."

.

In June 2002, Allen sued longtime friend and producer Jean Doumanian and her business partner and boyfriend Jacqui Safra, saying they cheated him out of his share of profits on eight movies made since 1993. Allen said the pair owed him more than 12 million dollars. The parties reached an undisclosed settlement after nine days in court.

.

"I think I've proved if nothing else that you can survive outside the system without films making much or any money. But it makes life easier, and it makes artistic life easier, if you could get a little help." – Allen quoted in Premiere magazine, February 2006

.

"I’ve always felt that life itself – and this is no brilliant observation – is a tremendously tragic event, a real mess with comic moments. I’ve always wanted to be a tragic writer." – Allen to the London Times, Sep. 3, 2007

.

"When you go into the business, all your illusions are shattered right away. You find out that great success or failure doesn't change your life in any meaningful way. So I gave up on that idea decades ago." – Allen to Interview magazine, September 2008

.

"There's nothing good about getting older. Absolutely nothing. You do gain a couple of things – a little wisdom from your heartbreaks and failures. But what you lose is so catastrophic in every other way." – Allen to Interview magazine, September 2008

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